Stereocheck Reviews:
How to choose the right phono stage
How to choose the right phono stage
How to choose the right phono stage

How to choose the right phono stage

The phono stage, also known as a phono preamp or phono preamplifier, plays a crucial role in the vinyl playback chain, especially for beginners in the realm of music appreciation. Despite its seemingly mysterious nature and sometimes hefty price tags, understanding the importance and diversity of phono stages can greatly enhance your vinyl listening experience.

Many entry-level turntables come with built-in phono preamps, which serve to amplify the signal from the turntable’s cartridge to a level suitable for playback through speakers or headphones. However, as turntables increase in price and quality, built-in preamps become less common and are often omitted entirely. While there are exceptions to this trend, the general rule remains: built-in preamps in budget players are typically of lower quality and are included primarily for convenience rather than optimal sound performance.

Image

Indeed, finding a truly high-quality built-in phono stage in amplifiers and receivers has become increasingly challenging in modern times. Manufacturers who prioritize offering a high-quality built-in preamp often provide it as an optional separate board, and even then, this solution is considered intermediate at best. Decent built-in preamps are typically only found in devices within the highest price category.

For those seeking optimal sound quality from their vinyl setup, investing in a standalone phono preamplifier with its own power supply is the recommended choice. This ensures greater control over the signal amplification and processing, leading to improved sound reproduction and overall listening experience.

Image

Transistor or lamp?

When considering tube phono stages available on the market, it’s important to distinguish between true tube models and hybrid ones. True tube models exclusively utilize tubes for both correction and amplification processes, offering a characteristic warm and rich sound. On the other hand, hybrid models incorporate electric tubes primarily to saturate the sound with even harmonics, while other components such as transistors or operational amplifiers handle the remaining signal processing. Hybrid models are more common among budget-friendly options.

When choosing between tube and transistor phono stages, it’s essential to consider not only the circuit’s general ideology but also the type of cartridge installed on your turntable. The compatibility with a specific cartridge is crucial, as different cartridges may have varying impedance and output levels, which can affect the performance of the phono stage. Therefore, it’s important to select a phono stage that matches well with the characteristics of your cartridge to achieve optimal sound quality.

Image

If you plan to use exclusively Moving Magnet (MM) cartridges with high sensitivity, then a true tube phono stage would be a suitable choice. Budget models typically offer a moderate gain level of around 36-38 dB and are compatible with MM cartridges with a sensitivity of at least 5 mV. As you move up in price range, tube phono stages with adjustable gain levels become available, providing flexibility to accommodate a wider range of MM cartridges.

Transistor-based phono stages, on the other hand, can achieve acceptable noise levels even with higher gain settings. Therefore, they are less sensitive to the cartridge’s sensitivity and can work well with a variety of MM cartridges. However, it’s important to ensure that the phono stage matches the impedance and output characteristics of your specific cartridge for optimal performance.

Image

In the higher price range, personal preferences and compatibility with your audio setup become crucial factors in choosing a phono stage. For instance, pairing a tube phono stage with highly sensitive speakers in a tube circuit may result in a noticeable increase in noise level, which might not be desirable for everyone. On the other hand, a transistor-based phono stage may not fully capture the timbral richness of your favorite recordings.

Therefore, it’s important to carefully consider your preferences regarding sound characteristics, as well as the specific requirements of your audio system, when selecting a phono stage in the higher price range. Additionally, listening tests and evaluations of compatibility with your existing equipment can help ensure that you choose a phono stage that best suits your needs and preferences.

Image

When using MC (Moving Coil) cartridges with low sensitivity, opting for an inexpensive tube phono stage may require additional equipment such as an external step-up transformer or an active MC amplifier. While expensive tube models often include built-in transformers for MC cartridges, some enthusiasts still prefer separate devices that are specifically selected to match the characteristics of the cartridge being used.

These external devices, whether step-up transformers or active MC amplifiers, can provide the necessary amplification and impedance matching to ensure optimal performance from low-sensitivity MC cartridges. They are especially important when using budget tube phono stages that may not have sufficient gain or impedance matching capabilities for these types of cartridges. Therefore, when considering a tube phono stage for use with low-sensitivity MC cartridges, it’s essential to factor in the potential need for additional equipment to achieve the desired sound quality.

Image

Indeed, a well-designed universal transistor phono stage offers several advantages, including minimal intrinsic noise and the ability to adjust gain, resistance, and capacitance to accommodate a wide range of MM and MC cartridges. This versatility makes it suitable for use with various types of turntables and cartridges without sacrificing sound quality.

Moreover, if your intention is to use the phono stage for digitizing vinyl records, a transistor model may be the preferable choice. Transistor phono stages often provide more accurate and transparent amplification, which can be beneficial for capturing the nuances of analog recordings during the digitization process. Additionally, they typically offer features such as precise gain adjustment and low distortion, which are essential for achieving high-quality digital transfers of vinyl records. Therefore, if digitization is a primary consideration, a well-designed transistor phono stage is recommended for optimal results.

Image

Absolutely, the choice between a tube and transistor phono stage ultimately depends on various factors such as the type of cartridge being used and the overall system setup. While there’s no universal rule, it’s generally easier to match a higher sensitivity cartridge with a phono stage, regardless of whether it’s a tube or transistor model.

However, low-sensitivity cartridges often offer the potential for more accurate signal conversion from vinyl records. To fully realize this potential, additional investment in a compatible phono stage may be necessary. This could include purchasing an external step-up transformer or active MC amplifier for use with MC cartridges, or selecting a high-quality transistor phono stage with precise gain adjustment and low noise characteristics. Ultimately, the goal is to find the right balance between the characteristics of the cartridge, the phono stage, and the overall system to achieve optimal sound quality and performance.

Image

Passive or active correction?

Indeed, from the end user’s perspective, both passive and active methods of restoring the RIAA curve can provide excellent sound quality when implemented correctly. However, it’s important to note that the final result with active correction heavily depends on the quality and precision of the active elements in the correction circuit, whether they are tubes, transistors, or operational amplifiers.

When considering vintage phono stages with active correction, it’s crucial to ensure that the components used in them have maintained their specified characteristics over time. For new devices, relying on your own hearing during the auditioning process can be sufficient to assess their performance and suitability for your setup. Ultimately, the goal is to choose a phono stage that complements your cartridge and system while delivering the desired sound quality.

Image

Cheap or expensive?

It’s important to approach the purchase of a budget phono stage with caution and awareness of potential trade-offs in quality. While inexpensive options from Chinese brands can offer a cost-effective entry point into the world of vinyl, it’s essential to recognize that quality may vary significantly among these products.

For beginners looking to dip their toes into vinyl without breaking the bank, starting with a budget-friendly phono stage can be a reasonable approach. However, as one’s appreciation for vinyl grows and their expectations for sound quality evolve, they may find themselves wanting to invest in a higher-quality phono stage to better complement their turntable setup.

Ultimately, finding the right balance between affordability and performance is key when selecting a phono stage, especially for those new to vinyl. As experience with vinyl listening deepens, it’s natural for enthusiasts to seek out higher-quality components to enhance their listening experience.

Image

Coordination with the system

The final crucial consideration is ensuring compatibility between the purchased equalizer and your integrated or preamplifier. It’s essential to thoroughly review the specifications of the equalizer to ensure that its output voltage at the stated input sensitivity is a minimum of 0.5 V, preferably higher. Failing to do so may result in diminished dynamics and overall volume levels in your audio system.

Show Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *