Hegel
Hegel
Hegel

Hegel

The history of Hegel Music Systems began in 1988. It was then that a student at the Norwegian University of Technology (Trondheim) began his thesis work, which examined the design of a transistor amplifier, devoid of the disadvantages inherent in classical systems.

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In general, Bent Holter became interested in electronics under the influence of his father. At the age of 12, he was already making printed circuit boards, and at the age of 13, he assembled an amplifier for an electric guitar. Holter played clarinet in an orchestra in his hometown of Gjøvik, Norway, and later became involved in local bands and sound engineering. “I started building my own equipment for my guitar and band—amps and speakers,” Holter says.

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Hegel H360

The history of Hegel Music Systems began in 1988. It was then that a student at the Norwegian University of Technology (Trondheim) began his thesis work, which examined the design of a transistor amplifier, devoid of the disadvantages inherent in classical systems. Bent delved into the study of the problem of harmonic distortion, the suppression of which by conventional methods led to the deterioration of other parameters, including the damping coefficient. He had at his disposal a powerful university computer that allowed him to simulate electronic circuits. So Holter laid the cornerstone of the company’s SoundEngine technology. A special circuit monitors the signal entering the amplifier and, if it deviates from the norm, the results are sent to a common processing unit – a threshold detector. The detector determines whether correction is necessary or not. If the answer is affirmative, distortions are cut off. Holter now notes that SoundEngine circuits “use feed-forward instead of negative feedback.” As a result, “intermodulation distortion is significantly reduced while the damping factor is increased.”

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Hegel H90 

The future company borrowed the name from the metal band The Hegel Band, where Bent played. Actually, both the group and, subsequently, the company are named after the German philosopher Hegel, whose views he shared and whose famous phrase we put in the title of this article. After graduating from university, Holter worked for Tandberg and then moved to the research organization SINTEF, continuing to develop amplifiers. To implement his ideas, funds were required. Later, an investor appeared – the Norwegian telecommunications company Telenor. The early 90s were a successful period for Hegel. SoundEngine technology was patented, the first proprietary DAC was born in 1994, and two years later the first CD player was released. Over the next eight years, the company expanded its product range, generating more and more profits year after year. In 1998, Hegel Music Systems presented its developments at the CES exhibition in Las Vegas and began exporting its products. During times of crisis, when competitors were cutting costs, the company behaved completely differently. Holter hired new engineers and with their help developed new DAC models. Today Hegel is one of the best players in the hi-fi field. The company’s brain center is located in Oslo. The catalog includes integrated and preamplifiers, amplifiers, CD players, and external DACs.

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Hegel H160+CDP2A 

The brand’s portfolio, in addition to SoundEngine, includes six more original technical solutions. The company has dealers in 32 countries, its products are sold all over the world, and numerous awards and reviews dedicated to its components speak for themselves. Many Hegel projects have received partial government subsidies.

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